Dangers of Osteoporosis Drugs

March 12, 2010 at 7:35 pm Leave a comment

FINALLY!  A study being presented this week (March 11, 2010) at the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons’ annual meeting links the use of bisphosphonates (Fosamax, Actonel, Boniva, etc.) to an increased risk of fracture in women, particularly in the hip and thigh.  Hip fractures are the leading cause of disability in elderly women.  The study was done at Columbia University College of Physicians & Surgeons in New York City.

A second study, performed at Weill Cornell Medical College in New York City revealed that women who had taken these drugs for an extended length of time (8.5 years on average) had “old” thighbones.  Normally, bone is about 20% new, 60% middle-aged and 20% old, as the bone remodels and replaces.  In the study, 90% of the bone from women taking these drugs is “old.”  This makes the bone extremely vulnerable to fracture, because of the body’s inability to repair micro-damage.  Micro-damage can be caused simply by climbing stairs, over-exercising, even dancing.

However, don’t think the medical recommendation is to stop taking these drugs.  Far from it!  Women are still being encouraged to take these dangerous drugs long-term.

Why do I say “finally”? If you’ve been a client at our Clinic, you know that I have been saying this for years. And, it isn’t in your best interest to wait for the medical community to catch on to the facts. To improve your bone density and strength, a combination of calcium, vitamin D and strontium (depending upon your blood picture) is much safer, and more effective than these drugs.  Contact us today if you have been told you are at risk for (or have) osteoporosis.

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Entry filed under: Calcium + Osteoporosis. Tags: .

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